The Mensch With No Name: Now On Paper!

Art by Cinsearae Santiago

Hey all, just a quick post this week to let you know Merkabah Rider 2: The Mensch With No Name is now available in print over on Amazon…

You can pick it up here –

http://www.amazon.com/Merkabah-Rider-Mensch-No-Name/dp/1615721908/ref=sr_1_2?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285291425&sr=8-2

For more on the book, read my previous post –

https://emerdelac.wordpress.com/2010/09/01/merkabah-rider…h-with-no-name/

And a quick apology to one of my favorite writers, though he probably wouldn’t want me to mention his name.  Him being long dead, I’ll do it anyway.

In the aforementioned post I neglected to cite the great Ambrose Bierce, whose story, ‘The Damned Thing’ was the main inspiration for ‘The Damned Dingus’ in The Mensch With No Name.

Bitter Bierce

 

From Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary –

STORY, n. A narrative, commonly untrue. The truth of the stories here following has, however, not been successfully impeached.

One evening Mr. Rudolph Block, of New York, found himself seated at dinner alongside Mr. Percival Pollard, the distinguished critic.
     “Mr. Pollard,” said he, “my book, The Biography of a Dead Cow, is published anonymously, but you can hardly be ignorant of its authorship. Yet in reviewing it you speak of it as the work of the Idiot of the Century. Do you think that fair criticism?”
     “I am very sorry, sir,” replied the critic, amiably, “but it did not occur to me that you really might not wish the public to know who wrote it.”

Mr. W.C. Morrow, who used to live in San Jose, California, was addicted to writing ghost stories which made the reader feel as if a stream of lizards, fresh from the ice, were streaking it up his back and hiding in his hair. San Jose was at that time believed to be haunted by the visible spirit of a noted bandit named Vasquez, who had been hanged there. The town was not very well lighted, and it is putting it mildly to say that San Jose was reluctant to be out o’ nights. One particularly dark night two gentlemen were abroad in the loneliest spot within the city limits, talking loudly to keep up their courage, when they came upon Mr. J.J. Owen, a well-known journalist.
      “Why, Owen,” said one, “what brings you here on such a night as this? You told me that this is one of Vasquez’ favorite haunts! And you are a believer. Aren’t you afraid to be out?”
     “My dear fellow,” the journalist replied with a drear autumnal cadence in his speech, like the moan of a leaf-laden wind, “I am afraid to be in. I have one of Will Morrow’s stories in my pocket and I don’t dare to go where there is light enough to read it.”

Published in: on September 23, 2010 at 7:49 pm  Leave a Comment  

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